Childhood cancers

Childhood cancers are Different types of cancer that develop in children.

  • Radiation:
    • Environmental radiation.
    • Radiation during pregnancy.
  • Excessive exposure to the ultraviolet radiation.
  • Infections: some of childhood cancers are caused by some viral infections.
  • Mother active or passive smoking during pregnancy, or during the period prior to conception.
  • Inherited genetic abnormalities.
  1. Continued, unexplained weight loss.
  2. Headaches, often with early morning vomiting.
  3. Increased swelling or persistent pain in bones, joints, back, or legs.
  4. Lump or mass, especially in the abdomen, neck, chest, pelvis, or armpits.
  5. Development of excessive bruising, bleeding, or rash.
  6. Constant infections.
  7. Awhitish color behind the pupil.
  8. Nausea which persists or vomiting without nausea.
  9. Constant tiredness or noticeable paleness.
  10. Eye or vision changes which occur suddenly and persist.
  11. Recurrent or persistent fevers of unknown origin.

You can reduce your child risk of cancer by:

  • Minimize radiation exposure during pregnancy.
  • Breast feeding for 6 months or longer, reduce your child risk of cancer.
  • Make sure that your child is taking all scheduled vaccines.
  • Help them adopt a healthy lifestyle with healthy eating habits and plenty of exercise to keep a healthy weight:
    • Replace their unhealthy snacks with fruits, vegetables and nuts.
    • Encourage them to play motor games instead of electronic games.
  • Protect your child from smoking:
    • Stop smoking during pregnancy.
    • After birth protect them from passive smoking.
  • Create a happy, laughter filled house; which will improve their immune systems.
  • Keep your children safe during sun exposure (use the sun protection items: sunglasses, sunblock, long sleeves clothes, and wide hats).
  • Keep healthy sleeping pattern for the children.
  • Parents should be sure that their children have regular medical check-ups and watch for any unusual signs or symptoms that do not go away.
  • Some children have a higher chance of developing a specific type of cancer because of certain gene changes they inherit from a parent. These children may need careful, regular medical check-ups that include special tests to look for early signs of cancer.
+ Risk factors
  • Radiation:
    • Environmental radiation.
    • Radiation during pregnancy.
  • Excessive exposure to the ultraviolet radiation.
  • Infections: some of childhood cancers are caused by some viral infections.
  • Mother active or passive smoking during pregnancy, or during the period prior to conception.
  • Inherited genetic abnormalities.
+ Early signs and symptoms
  1. Continued, unexplained weight loss.
  2. Headaches, often with early morning vomiting.
  3. Increased swelling or persistent pain in bones, joints, back, or legs.
  4. Lump or mass, especially in the abdomen, neck, chest, pelvis, or armpits.
  5. Development of excessive bruising, bleeding, or rash.
  6. Constant infections.
  7. Awhitish color behind the pupil.
  8. Nausea which persists or vomiting without nausea.
  9. Constant tiredness or noticeable paleness.
  10. Eye or vision changes which occur suddenly and persist.
  11. Recurrent or persistent fevers of unknown origin.
+ Prevention

You can reduce your child risk of cancer by:

  • Minimize radiation exposure during pregnancy.
  • Breast feeding for 6 months or longer, reduce your child risk of cancer.
  • Make sure that your child is taking all scheduled vaccines.
  • Help them adopt a healthy lifestyle with healthy eating habits and plenty of exercise to keep a healthy weight:
    • Replace their unhealthy snacks with fruits, vegetables and nuts.
    • Encourage them to play motor games instead of electronic games.
  • Protect your child from smoking:
    • Stop smoking during pregnancy.
    • After birth protect them from passive smoking.
  • Create a happy, laughter filled house; which will improve their immune systems.
  • Keep your children safe during sun exposure (use the sun protection items: sunglasses, sunblock, long sleeves clothes, and wide hats).
  • Keep healthy sleeping pattern for the children.
+ Screening
  • Parents should be sure that their children have regular medical check-ups and watch for any unusual signs or symptoms that do not go away.
  • Some children have a higher chance of developing a specific type of cancer because of certain gene changes they inherit from a parent. These children may need careful, regular medical check-ups that include special tests to look for early signs of cancer.

Last reviewed in November 2017